The Satisfaction Factor

The Satisfaction Factor

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Handshake2.svg

A while ago, I tuned in to a fascinating interview on a Montreal radio station (Radio Canada) regarding the level of satisfaction of business clients and the impact on the popularity and success of a business venture.

According to an elaborate survey conducted by Leger Marketing Firm, a Montreal firm, 13% of clients who are unhappy with services in a business transaction were likely to talk about their bad experience, whereas only 5% of clients who are satisfied are likely to talk about their good experience.

The Real Estate Industry it is an environment geared toward sociability. The Realtor/Client relationship is a meeting of the minds and personalities. One must almost have a knack for psychology, or at least great empathy, to be able to listen well and determine a client’s preferences, style and needs.

The Retail Industry, on the other hand, does not necessarily lend itself to such rapports. The Client, in this case, is often perceived as an intruder, someone who interrupts the course of a project or dismantles painstakingly organized displays. This is a distorted perception, of course, but very real nonetheless. In this context, the business operator is more vulnerable than the client. How this vulnerability is handled has a direct impact on image and success.

Real Estate professionals must naturally demonstrate a great sense of ethics and decorum. In Real Estate, the Client places his or her own property, existent or future, in the hands of a stranger. This involves a measure of vulnerability and a decision to trust. It is up to the Realtor to establish this trust. The Client’s best interest must be the first goal, not the sale itself.

For the duration of a business relationship of any sort, strangers become acquaintances; kinfolk who must have every reason to know they are in good hands. When this sort of relationship is established, satisfaction often leads to lasting connections, quite naturally. Only a people-centric focus can accomplish this.